White Bear Smiles

White Bear Smiles

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Dental Implant Restoration

How can we help you?

At White Bear Smiles, we strongly believe in education, both for ourselves and for our patients. We've found that patients who take charge of their dental care and ask questions about their health, our practice, and dentistry in general tend to have better overall outcomes. 

So go ahead! Ask us your questions! We're happy to take the time to give you the information you need to make decisions about your care. 

We've collected some of our most commonly heard questions here, but if you need more information or you don't see your question, don't hesitate to give us a call. We're here to help.

Dental Implant Restoration

Dental implants are definitely a practical option. They are not, however, suitable for everyone. Healthy gums and bone are necessary to support implants, which are metal posts that are surgically placed in the bone under your gums. Also, because the placement of implants is a surgical procedure, a candidate must be in good overall health. Since good periodontal health is key to the success of an implant, smokers and diabetics may not be candidates for implants.

After a period of healing, during which the bone grows around the post, a replacement tooth, or crown, is attached to the post. Implants also can be used to secure a bridge or dentures when more than one tooth is missing.

Placing implants is not a dental specialty. So a team of dentists may be involved in placing an implant. One dentist, for instance, may do the surgery to put the implant in the bone and another may place the crown on the post.

Talk to your dentist about whether you are a candidate for dental implants. Also check with your dental insurance plan to see if the procedure is fully or partially covered.

Now, more than ever, there is hope and there are good options. Lost teeth often result in changes of the bite over time, loss of function and nutrition, leading to more decay, bone loss, and breakdown -- and of course there's the esthetic issue of missing teeth.

These adverse effects can happen slowly, so that you don't really notice them until they are quite advanced. The more we can maintain and improve our dental health now, the better we can deal with the problems of dental aging.

Modern dentistry can more simply and easily correct and improve these situations with implants that look and feel like teeth, life-like bridges, thin and flexible partials, and even better dentures! Several options usually will work, and the patient and their dentist can determine which one is most appropriate for their situation and budget.

Ask your dentist what options may be right for you, or feel free to call us for a complimentary consultation.

Yes! For many situations there is now a method for doing this, called CADCAM CEREC dentistry. Long-term studies have shown that this technique results in restorations of excellent esthetics and durability. The CEREC treatment procedure means:

  • No Conventional Impressions The CEREC 3D measuring camera scans the prepared tooth in just a few seconds. This eliminates the need for unpleasant silicone impressions.
  • No Temporaries CEREC restorations are milled out of a high-quality ceramic material in just a few minutes. They are ready to be placed immediately. This takes away the need for temporary fillings and crowns.
  • No Long Waiting Periods Because CEREC restorations can be placed immediately, you need only one appointment. This means less time off work, less travel, and no need for more injections!

There will always be situations needing conventional dentistry but fortunately CEREC dentistry will provide much benefit to many grateful patients.

To find out if CEREC dentistry is an option for you, give us a call at (651) 346-0711 -- We will be happy to answer your questions on this new technology.

Now, more than ever, there is hope and there are good options. Lost teeth often result in changes of the bite over time, loss of function and nutrition, leading to more decay, bone loss, and breakdown -- and of course there's the esthetic issue of missing teeth.

These adverse effects can happen slowly, so that you don't really notice them until they are quite advanced. The more we can maintain and improve our dental health now, the better we can deal with the problems of dental aging.

Modern dentistry can more simply and easily correct and improve these situations with implants that look and feel like teeth, life-like bridges, thin and flexible partials, and even better dentures! Several options usually will work, and the patient and their dentist can determine which one is most appropriate for their situation and budget.

Ask your dentist what options may be right for you, or feel free to call us for a complimentary consultation.

While more and more Americans are keeping all their teeth, tooth loss still happens and there are consequences – none of which are good.

First of all, teeth support each other, like good neighbors. When one tooth is lost, the teeth next to the vacated spot begin to shift. This can lead to problems with chewing and cleaning. Once remaining teeth begin to tilt, food can get trapped in gaps between the teeth and the gum. This can contribute to both tooth decay and periodontal, or gum, disease.

When teeth are lost, the pressure of chewing is thrown off and can make eating difficult. Teeth bearing an inordinate amount of pressure in the new chewing pattern may shift and eventually loosen.

You may also notice a change in the sound of words you speak.

If you do lose a tooth, your dentist can advise you on whether a bridge – an artificial tooth fastened to neighboring teeth – or an implant may be right for you. The best advice, though, is to keep your natural teeth through a regimen of good oral hygiene and regular visits to your dentist.

While more and more Americans are keeping all their teeth, tooth loss still happens and there are consequences – none of which are good.

First of all, teeth support each other, like good neighbors. When one tooth is lost, the teeth next to the vacated spot begin to shift. This can lead to problems with chewing and cleaning. Once remaining teeth begin to tilt, food can get trapped in gaps between the teeth and the gum. This can contribute to both tooth decay and periodontal, or gum, disease.

When teeth are lost, the pressure of chewing is thrown off and can make eating difficult. Teeth bearing an inordinate amount of pressure in the new chewing pattern may shift and eventually loosen.

You may also notice a change in the sound of words you speak.

If you do lose a tooth, your dentist can advise you on whether a bridge – an artificial tooth fastened to neighboring teeth – or an implant may be right for you. The best advice, though, is to keep your natural teeth through a regimen of good oral hygiene and regular visits to your dentist.

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